On Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 8:40 AM, bbiker<renard / nc.rr.com> wrote:
> On Aug 3, 4:38 am, Harry Kakueki <list.p... / gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Mon, Aug 3, 2009 at 5:17 PM, Bertram Scharpf<li... / bertram-scharpf.de> wrote:
>> > Hi,
>>
>> > Am Montag, 03. Aug 2009, 09:11:11 +0900 schrieb Bertram Scharpf:
>> >> Am Montag, 03. Aug 2009, 05:50:10 +0900 schrieb Wojciech Piekutowski:
>> >> >   a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>
>> >> I would even prefer a behaviour like this:
>>
>> >>   a[3,-3]    #=> [4,3,2]
>>
>> >> This would be the least surprise to me.
>>
>> > Sorry! The least surprise of course would be
>>
>> >  a[3,-3]    #=> [3,2,1]
>>
>> > Bertram
>>
>> > --
>> > Bertram Scharpf
>> > Stuttgart, Deutschland/Germany
>> >http://www.bertram-scharpf.de
>>
>> Really?
>>
>> a = [1,2,3,4,5]
>> p a[3,2] #=> [4, 5]
>>
>> #p a[3,-3] #=> [4,3,2]
>> #a[start,length]
>>
>> This seems least surprising to me.
>>
>> Harry
>>
>> --
>> A Look into Japanese Ruby List in Englishhttp://www.kakueki.com/ruby/list.html
>
> I'm sorry to butt in, but your getting exactly what you  ask for but
> you expecting otherwise!
>
> a[x, y]   means starting at element x give me up to y elements
>
> a = [1.2.3.4,5]
> a[-3,3]   => [3,4,5]
> a[-3,4]   => [3.4,5]
>
> a[-3,0]  => []
>
> a[3,-3]  =>    # there is no such thing  -3 elements  therefore it
> returns nil
>
>

I am not expecting otherwise.
I realize it does not work, and I understand why.
That is why it is commented out.

It was suggested that this type of behavior would be nice.

If it did work, I would expect it to work that way.

Harry

-- 
A Look into Japanese Ruby List in English
http://www.kakueki.com/ruby/list.html