"marc" <gmane / auxbuss.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag 
news:h0b1jf$pm3$1 / ger.gmane.org...
> Michael Bruschkewitz said:
>> My argument was:
>> If you're in an environment which is familiar to Java but not to Ruby, I
>> would prefer Groovy.
>
> Sure, the barrier to entry is lower. Also, as a manager type, I often
> encounter devs who treat their day job as just that and are not
> interested or motivated to learn more than they have to - they quietly
> drive me nuts, to be honest! If this is the case, then Groovy is more
> likely to succeed - and you won't encounter quiet hostility every day at
> work!

Hello Marc,
your arguments target "devs" - I suppose you mean "software developers".
But you don't know which is the environment of OP.
Imagine, he develops software for medical devices, for example. Most 
probably, people in his environment would be highly specialized biologists, 
physicists, physicians a.s.o. which only accidentally do something related 
to software. Maybe adapting some parameters. Forcing them to learn another 
language just because it's "better" some way would be wasting resources.
Imagine space, car, rail, weapons, energy related projects - everywhere you 
will work with people which are highly specialized on their area. In most 
real-world projects, you will have tight deadlines. So, low entry barriers 
are important for the success of most projects.
That's for short term.

For long term I supposed both languages for reasons as you mentioned below.

Unfortunately, OP did not tell about his needs or environment.

> If you have "old skool" devs who are interested in their work, then I'd
> push on with JRuby (and by association Ruby).

It always depends on (their) plans for future. And depends on how much time 
is needed or available until targets must be reached.

> Ruby isn't "better",
> necessarily, but it has features that allow you to do things a lot more
> tersely than Java, which I'm sure we'll agree is rather a verbose
> language, and I like that.
> There's also an element of simply using and doing something different.
> It's refreshing, invigorating, and I believe aids creativity.

No doubt.