Ken Bloom <kbloom / gmail.com> writes:

> On Sat, 21 Feb 2009 15:37:34 -0800, Avatar wrote:
>
>> A new object-oriented programming language has been unofficially
>> released. There are some interesting details already published at the
>> in-progress website (www.nexuslang.org). The language is a marriage
>> between concepts introduced by Lua and Ruby. Strong influences from both
>> languages with an eye towards simplification. The language itself
>> introduces rarely seen strict left-to-right expression evaluation. There
>> is no implicit operator precedence, the programmer is forced to be
>> explicit with parenthetical expression, which has the added benefit of
>> readability. Another form of this strict left-to-right evaluation is the
>> assignment operator (^), rather then using the traditional <variable> =
>> <value> syntax, a value is put on the stack and then assigned to one or
>> more named memory location on the right (i.e. 1+2^a^b, a*b^c). Another
>> interesting feature is the inclusion method overloading.
>
> "There are no precedence rules applied to operators, they are simply 
> evaluated from left to right. Operator precedence is explicity applied 
> with the use of parenthetical expressions. The following example 
> demonstrates explicit operator precedence."
>
> Looks like a cross between Ruby and INTERCAL. When 1.0+2.0/3.0+4.0=5.0, 
> that's not a good thing, and will confuse most mathemeticians to no end. 
> And the use of ^ for assignment will also be very unintuitive.
>
> At the same time, I don't see *any* conceptual advantages over Ruby. Just 
> different, unintutitive, syntax.

Well if you need to talk about no conceptual advantage and just
different unintuitive syntax, you can say the same of Ruby vs. Lisp.

Once you start creating gratuituous languages such as Ruby, why not go
on and change everything every years with a new gratuituously
different language. This year, let's all switch all to Nexus.  Next
year, I've got already another variant in preparation...


Just stop the sillyness, let's all use Common Lisp, the ultimate
programming language! 

-- 
__Pascal Bourguignon__