Alex Fenton wrote:
> Adam Gardner wrote:
> 
>> More importantly, what's the output of these commands?
>> $ file ~/bleed/bin/ruby
>> $ file ~/bleed/lib/libruby.1.9.1.dylib
> 
> Abaddon:ruby-1.9.1-p0 alex$ file ~/bleed/bin/ruby
> /Users/alex/bleed/bin/ruby: Mach-O universal binary with 2 architectures
> /Users/alex/bleed/bin/ruby (for architecture i386):  Mach-O executable 
> i386
> /Users/alex/bleed/bin/ruby (for architecture ppc):  Mach-O executable 
> ppc
> Abaddon:ruby-1.9.1-p0 alex$ file ~/bleed/lib/libruby-static.a
> /Users/alex/bleed/lib/libruby-static.a: Mach-O universal binary with 2
> architectures
> /Users/alex/bleed/lib/libruby-static.a (for architecture i386):  current
> ar archive random library
> /Users/alex/bleed/lib/libruby-static.a (for architecture ppc):  current
> ar archive random library
> 
> alex

Sorry, it took me so long to respond to this. If the 'file' command 
reports that it's a Mach-O universal binary with 2 architectures, then 
you *did* build ruby as universal. Whether it works or not is an open 
question, but it's a universal binary either way. The ruby version 
string (in particular, the 'i386-darwin9.0' bit) is just an 
informational text string stored in rbconfig.rb, generated at some point 
during the build process. You could open rbconfig.rb and change the 
platform string to 'my-little-pony' and it probably wouldn't change a 
thing (until you try to run a script that checks that value to determine 
what platform-specific code to run, I guess).

- Adam
-- 
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