The cocoa objective-c java bridge is deprecated from my understanding,  
and cocoa is copyright, so there'd be little point, tho I dunno why  
jruby couldn't theoretically run the cooaruby code

Blog: http://random8.zenunit.com/
Learn rails: http://sensei.zenunit.com/

On 05/02/2009, at 12:29 PM, Logan Barnett <logustus / gmail.com> wrote:

>
> On Feb 4, 2009, at 5:54 PM, Adam Gardner wrote:
>
>> Julian Leviston wrote:
>>> How would it be technically possible to do jruby cocoa If the  
>>> machines
>>> weren't macs?
>>>
>>> Blog: http://random8.zenunit.com/
>>> Learn rails: http://sensei.zenunit.com/
>>>
>>> On 05/02/2009, at 10:46 AM, Adam Gardner <adam.oddfellow / gmail.com>
>>
>> It wouldn't be, but, so? Who says you can't use JRuby on a Mac?
>
> I certainly use JRuby on Mac!
> However, I think Julian is asking if his JRuby Cocoa app will run on  
> things that aren't Macs. My thought is no. Cocoa would need to be  
> running on the other platforms for that to work. My understanding is  
> that Apple provides some Java libs that hook into Cocoa, which makes  
> JRuby development possible.
>
>> Perhaps you're following the MVC pattern, and the Model and perhaps
>> Controller are written using normal old ruby code (perhaps with some
>> java stuff thrown in), and then you create a distinct View for  
>> different
>> platforms. Of course, I'm sure you could use Swing or AWT or  
>> something
>> (I'm not too familiar with Java GUI frameworks)... it'd be a lot less
>> effort, but with OS X GUI applications, if the interface is not  
>> done in
>> Cocoa or Carbon, it usually sticks out like a sore thumb.
>
> Java Swing apps (including JRuby ones, like when you write a  
> Monkeybars app - http://monkeybars.rubyforge.org/) by default on  
> Macs will render components using the System Look and Feel, which  
> under the hood will use the OS's native code to render buttons and  
> other widgets. Check out an app like FrostWire (http://www.frostwire.com/ 
>  - Java) or JotBot (http://getjotbot.com/ - JRuby with Monkeybars)
>
> SWT (not to be confused with AWT) is much more close to native look  
> and feels, but I think it marries you a lot more to a particular  
> platform. Check out Azureus for an SWT app in Java (http://www.azureus.com/ 
> ). Glimmer is the only JRuby SWT framework I know of - https://rubyforge.org/projects/glimmer/
>
> Either way you go, it's possible to make apps that look good and  
> look native, but how many apps look like iTunes that you'd say also  
> look native? Pages doesn't look like iTunes, yet it looks native.  
> What about Colloquy? I think a native look is a fuzzy definition.  
> The most important thing is that you app does something useful, and  
> does it easily. That's not to say there isn't value in making a nice  
> interface that looks like it belongs on the OS with all of the other  
> apps. (:
>
>