I meant, every expression is an object. Not sure that's the case with clisp.

"Pascal J. Bourguignon" <pjb / informatimago.com> wrote in message 
news:87hc48bsgp.fsf / informatimago.com...
> "Haris Bogdanovic" <fbogdanovic / xnet.hr> writes:
>
>> In Ruby everything is an object. That's my favourite Ruby's feature. And 
>> you
>> showed that by just making one module you can have Lisp like functional
>> programming. So I'll stick with Ruby.
>
> In Lisp too, everything is an object.  But there are several kinds of
> objects, and you can create your own kinds too (you can write new
> meta-classes in CLOS).
>
> C/USER[15]> (defclass automobile () ())
> #1=#<STANDARD-CLASS AUTOMOBILE>
> C/USER[16]> (defvar *car* (make-instance 'automobile))
> *CAR*
> C/USER[17]> (class-of *car*)
> #1=#<STANDARD-CLASS AUTOMOBILE>
> C/USER[18]> (class-of 1)
> #1=#<BUILT-IN-CLASS INTEGER>
> C/USER[19]> (class-of "string")
> #1=#<BUILT-IN-CLASS STRING>
> C/USER[20]> (defstruct wheel)
> WHEEL
> C/USER[21]> (defclass automobile () ((wheels :accessor wheels :initform 
> (list (make-wheel) (make-wheel) (make-wheel) (make-wheel)))))
> WARNING: DEFCLASS: Class AUTOMOBILE (or one of its ancestors) is being 
> redefined, instances are obsolete
> #1=#<STANDARD-CLASS AUTOMOBILE :VERSION 1>
> C/USER[22]> (wheels *car*)
> (#S(WHEEL) #S(WHEEL) #S(WHEEL) #S(WHEEL))
> C/USER[23]> (class-of (wheels *car*))
> #1=#<BUILT-IN-CLASS CONS>
> C/USER[24]> (class-of (first (wheels *car*)))
> #1=#<STRUCTURE-CLASS WHEEL>
> C/USER[25]>
>
> -- 
> __Pascal Bourguignon__