On 15.10.2008 18:29, Bryan Richardson wrote:
> Well, I'm not sure the 'start /affinity' approach is fixing my problem
> either... the applications still seem to trade off computing time.

Well, what did you expect?  Even if you set affinity, OS scheduling 
still takes place.  With other processes running you might actually 
negatively impact the whole system by restricting processor affinity.

> This might be for a couple of reasons:
> 
> 1) Does Ruby try to be *smart* and consolidate all Ruby processes in one thread?

No.  Why should that be smart anyway (keep in mind that Ruby uses green 
threads)?

> 2) My Ruby applications are starting up and making calls to a Windows
> application via an OLE interface, so maybe the referenced Windows
> applications are running on the same processor.

You disclose details about your application piecemeal.  It's difficult 
to analyze this remotely anyway but it's impossible when you do not know 
what other facts are missing.

> Suggestions?

Keep on looking.  Did you try how your OS scheduling works with the 
example I gave you earlier?

Kind regards

	robert