On 1/17/02 11:41 AM, "Josh Huber" <huber / alum.wpi.edu> wrote:

> Chris Gehlker <gehlker / fastq.com> writes:
> 
>> I couldn't find ulimit in my one Linux book. I'm guessing that it
>> has something to do with setting how much stack and heap any user
>> gets. Can't do that here. Every user gets all they want until the
>> memory manager runs out of swap space.
> 
> Er, try man pages:

Ignore previous post. It's 'man ulimit' returns nothing but 'man limit'
dumps the tcsh page and man setrlimit says there is a way.
> 
> man bash, search for ulimit:


> 
> ulimit [-SHacdflmnpstuv [limit]]
>      Provides control over the resources available to the shell and
>      to processes started by it, on systems that allow such control.
>      The -H and -S options specify that the hard or soft limit is
>      set for the given resource.  A hard limit cannot be increased
>      once it is set; a soft limit may be increased up to the value
>      of the hard limit.  If neither -H nor -S is specified, both the
>      soft and hard limits are set.  The value of limit can be a
>      number in the unit specified for the resource or one of the
>      special values hard, soft, or unlim- ited, which stand for the
>      current hard limit, the current soft limit, and no limit,
>      respectively.  If limit is omitted, the current value of the
>      soft limit of the resource is printed, unless the -H option is
>      given.  When more than one resource is specified, the limit
>      name and unit are printed before the value.  Other options are
>      interpreted as follows:
>      -a     All current limits are reported
>      -c     The maximum size of core files created
>      -d     The maximum size of a process's data segment
>      -f     The maximum size of files created by the shell
>      -l     The maximum size that may be locked into memory
>      -m     The maximum resident set size
>      -n     The maximum number of open file descriptors (most
>             systems do not allow this value to be set)
>      -p     The pipe size in 512-byte blocks (this may not be set)
>      -s     The maximum stack size
>      -t     The maximum amount of cpu time in seconds
>      -u     The maximum number of processes available to a single user
>      -v     The maximum amount of virtual memory available to the shell
> 
> Are you sure darwin does not support setting a stack size limit?  I'd
> be surprised...

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