On Thu, Sep 4, 2008 at 8:04 AM, mosar <jean.moser / neuf.fr> wrote:
> In a study(#31) published by the American Accounting Association, prof
> Ijiri
> has suggested a new way to treat accounting transactions by mean of
> asymetrical arrays and using wealth and income accounts instead of
> debit and credit accounts.
As a former student of accounting this sounds rather interesting.

> In a little program I have tried to  to use this kind of approach.My
> first program contains two classes: a class Account and and class
> Records.
> In the first part of my program (class Account part) I have introduced
> an initialize method and a balance methods.Furthermore there is
> another method whis is:
>
> def add_record(record)
>     @records<< record
> end
>
> The class Record part of the program contains  these two lines of
> program:
>                .
>                .
>    wealth_account.add_record(self)
>    income_acount.add_record(self)
>
>                 .
>                 .
If I had to take a wild guess, I assume these two lines are located
inside an instance method of the Record class, correct?

> It means that the two objects wealth_account and income_account call
> the def add-record method.
> What I don't understand is, if  instead of the word record I put any
> word like a, x  it is working properly. My question is: how does the
> program know that it has to go to the lines of code where  I
> instantiate the records. As the user I know where I can find the
> records but there is no special flags which indicate these lines.
>
The program does not automatically create an instance of Record when
you say "weath_account.add_record(self)".  At this point the instance
of the record has to have already been constructed, if you're
referencing it with self.

This is very confusing, maybe you could try and clarify the situation
a bit more?  The more code you can post the better...

HTH,
Michael Guterl