Hi Andy,

If you use IP addresses (rather than a host), and those IP-addresses are 
bound to single NICs, and you know these IP addresses, then I *think* 
you don't have to do anything more complicated then literally specify 
the IP addresses when you connect...

So, if you can do (as you say 'wget'):

telnet ip0 80
telnet ip1 80

And issue a :

GET HTTP://ip0/webapp HTTP/1.0

Then you are away.

Once complication I can think off, which is sometimes enforced on 
webservers is that the 'GET' request has to correspond to the host you 
have connected to.

I mean:

www.mywebsite.com, might be on IP1, IP2, so you could get to it (in a 
browser) like:

http://www.mywebsite.com
-or-
http://x1.x1.x1.x1
-or-
http://x2.x2.x2.x2

Your browser will implicitly issue a 'GET' command based on the host you 
provided in the URL. The server _may_ verify this is the same.

So, if you were to 'telnet' to http://www.mywebsite.com on port 80 but 
then issue a GET like this:

GET http://x1.x1.x1.x1 HTTP/1.0

The server may reject you (since you connected on hostname, but tried to 
GET a different 'host')

So your program may have to take this into account. (ie, you may need to 
rewrite your URLs dependant on what host/IP you are talking to )

I hope that makes sense , and I hope I'm not wildly inaccurate 
there...(as I say, not a n/w expert...)

John
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