Dave Thomas wrote:
> On Aug 13, 2008, at 3:32 PM, Thomas Luedeke wrote:
> 
>> I'm pretty new at this - what is the command to do so?
> 
> 
> dave[ATCOCOA/Book 15:47:45] ri Process::Status
> ------------------------------------------------- Class: Process::Status
>       Process::Status encapsulates the information on the status of a
>       running or terminated system process. The built-in variable $? is
>       either nil or a Process::Status object.
> 
>          fork { exit 99 }   #=> 26557
>          Process.wait       #=> 26557
>          $?.class           #=> Process::Status
>          $?.to_i            #=> 25344
>          $? >> 8            #=> 99
>          $?.stopped?        #=> false
>          $?.exited?         #=> true
>          $?.exitstatus      #=> 99
> 
>       Posix systems record information on processes using a 16-bit
>       integer. The lower bits record the process status (stopped,
>       exited, signaled) and the upper bits possibly contain additional
>       information (for example the program's return code in the case of
>       exited processes). Pre Ruby 1.8, these bits were exposed directly
>       to the Ruby program. Ruby now encapsulates these in a
>       Process::Status object. To maximize compatibility, however, these
>       objects retain a bit-oriented interface. In the descriptions that
>       follow, when we talk about the integer value of stat, we're
>       referring to this 16 bit value.
> 
> 
> You can just use
> 
>    p $?
> 
> to get information. If it was signaled (perhaps because a process
> limit was exceeded) you can find the cause.
> 
> Dave



Hmmm. This doesn't seem to mean much to me, but here's what it put out:

#<Process::Status: pid=1132,exited(1)>


Mean something to you?  Sorry to be so dense, but I'm used to Korn shell 
scripting, where things seem less separated from the processes.
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