S2 wrote:
> My company today decided to ditch ruby development and to develop new web
> applications only with Java or .net.
> Current RoR applications will be migrated to Java.
> Sigh. No more ruby for me (in office hours).
> But anyway: are here some Java devs who may suggest some Java frameworks
> similar to RoR? Maybe something that emulates Activerecord and is as
> flexible, powerful and convenient to use as the ActionPack?
> 
> 

Rather than berate your management for the decision I'll try to answer your actual question ;)

I switch between RoR and Java regularly for different clients.

For Java I use the Spring framework almost exclusively. I do not use Hibernate as I prefer to use 
springs DAO framework, and the various jdbc wrappers they provide, I like to get my hands dirty with 
SQL, and you can make things very efficient that way too.

Spring has a fairly steep learning curve but is well documented and supported and has many 
components, from JMS, WEBMVC, JDBC etc. you can pretty much do everything with the Spring framework.

I use a standard architecture where you have web servers, talking to middleware servers via JMS, 
this separates all database access out of the web layer. Then the middleware layer is composed of a 
JMS layer calling POJO's and the POJO's call the DAO layer which talks to the database, so 
everything is cleanly separated. All database access is in the DAO layer, all Business logic is in 
the POJOs. This makes testing pretty easy, I write JUnit tests (using hamcrest matchers) for the 
DAOs, and for the POJOS, so I can test database independent of business logic and vice versa.

It is not as much fun as RoR, but it sure is much easier to scale for huge loads.

I use Eclipse as my IDE for Java development.

I would guess it takes me twice as long to write a given application in Java as it would in RoR, not 
including the scaling issues.

I write all my support scripts and database management code in Ruby and use the Sequel GEM, so I 
still get my ruby fix even when on a Java project.

Good luck


-- 
Jim Morris, http://blog.wolfman.com