On 29.06.2008 14:43, Rick DeNatale wrote:
> [Note:  parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]
> 
> On Sun, Jun 29, 2008 at 6:27 AM, Robert Klemme <shortcutter / googlemail.com>
> wrote:
> 
>> On 29.06.2008 11:18, Marc Heiler wrote:
>>
>>> truthy and falsy?
>>>
>>> Is this baby-talk? :)
>>>
>> I think it's just the attempt to find words that cannot be confused with
>> "true" and "false" (the objects).
>>
> 
> Well it is that, but...

Interesting stuff that you dug up there. :-)

> It turns out that the word "truthy" has some history.  According to this
> Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truthiness it appears in the
> O.E.D. along with "Truthiness" which was popularized recently in the US by
> political satirist Stephen Colbert as a term for the property of something
> being known instinctively from the (political) "gut" without regard to
> evidence, or facts.
> 
> I don't have access to the O.E.D. but my 1978 edition of Webster's New 20th
> Century Dictionary of the English Languate (unabridged) defines truthy as a
> dialect variation of truthful.

Webster's online version does not give much insight:
http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/truthy

> Falsy is just a similar construction, chosen no doubt so as to avoid
> confusion with falsie a word usually used in the plural which has an
> entirely different meaning. <G>

"Falsy" isn't there...

http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definition/falsy

... but the link to the different meaning. :-)))

Cheers

	robert