Eleanor McHugh wrote:
> On 11 May 2008, at 09:58, 7stud -- wrote:
>>
>> Why would that help?  The output in the file is 0A 0D, which is a
>> windows newline.  If the file was not opened in binary mode, that  
>> means
>> the ruby code must have tried to write '\n' to the file, which ruby  
>> then
>> converted to the OS's newline, which for windows is 0A 0D.  However,
>> getting the string "a + newline" from the user and then chomp()'ing  
>> off
>> the newline should leave you with "a".  And using putc() to write the
>> string "a" to a file does not involve any newlines.
> 
> Because he's not reading or writing 'a' (ASCII character 97) but the
> linefeed character (ASCII character 10, otherwise known as CTRL-A).

I don't understand where the op is writing the LF character?  It's 
obvious from the file output that the op's ruby code must be trying to 
write a '\n'  to the file somewhere, which then gets converted to a 
windows newline, which is a '\r\n', or 0A 0D in hex.   But the op claims 
to be entering an 'a' for input.  The op's program then chomps() off any 
newline.  So where does the ruby code write a '\n' to the file?
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