On Tue, Apr 22, 2008 at 10:55 PM, Michael W. Ryder
<_mwryder / worldnet.att.net> wrote:
> Robert Dober wrote:
>
> > On Tue, Apr 22, 2008 at 9:15 PM, Michael W. Ryder
> > <_mwryder / worldnet.att.net> wrote:
> >
> > > Robert Klemme wrote:
> > >
> >
> >
> > >  Coming from a background in computers from the 70's when the language
> was
> > > much closer to the metal I never had any problems with Go To or Jump.
> In
> > > assembler there is no way to not use Jumps for loops or conditional
> > > processing.  Fortran and Basic were much the same way.  I believe
> Knuth's
> > > original works were from this era and of course a lot of his code is in
> the
> > > MIX assembler.
> > >
> > Very true, but as I have mentioned one has to be disciplined.
> >
> > >  I can see the reason to eliminate jumping around in code when possible
> but
> > > think they can sometimes make a program easier to read.  I find it
> easier to
> > > read a program that says "If error goto ERROR" over trying to figure out
> > > where a Break command goes.
> > >
> > Then maybe your methods are too complex, what about refactoring ;)
> > Honestly I try to avoid methods with more than 10-12 LOC (I do not
> > succeed all the time) but up to 20LOC might be acceptable.
> > You really *should* be able to see where the break goes.
> >
> >
>
>  Most of my programming is for business use.  A lot of the time the user
> will make an entry and depending on what they enter the program will
> continue or jump to a totally different area.  While it may be possible to
> do with a couple of different entries to eliminate the jumps I don't think
> it makes the code any more readable, and after that it is almost impossible.
> I did manage something like this in C using a case statement to determine
> what function to call next but Business Basic does not have this ability.

Well without the code I cannot really help but somehow I have the
feeling that send might be your friend here!

R.
-- 
http://ruby-smalltalk.blogspot.com/

---
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.
Ludwig Wittgenstein