On Tue, Apr 15, 2008 at 4:20 PM, Avdi Grimm <avdi / avdi.org> wrote:
> On Tue, Apr 15, 2008 at 9:25 AM, SpringFlowers AutumnMoon
>  <summercoolness / gmail.com> wrote:
>  > it looks like Prototype was made to mimic Ruby in Javascript, and people
>  >  who use Prototype usually love it.  I wonder if Ruby can be made into
>  >  another browser side language and what can make that happen?  If Firefox
>  >  adds a Ruby interpreter to its browser and some killer websites come out
>  >  with features only supported by Ruby-enabled browsers, maybe Microsoft
>  >  and Apple will have incentive to make Ruby go into IE and Safari too?
>
>  Microsoft is way ahead of Mozilla and Apple in that department.
>  Silverlight allows web pages to be scripted with Ruby.
>
>  But I don't think it's going to take off, any more than previous
>  attempts to put VBScript, Python, TCL, etc. in the browser have
>  succeeded.  Browser makers have a hard enough time standardizing their
>  rendering of [X]HTML, ECMAScript, and CSS without adding more
>  languages for them to handle in subtly incompatible ways.
>
Quite agree with you and actually Javascript is not bad a language at
all, although Prototype is a nice extension. It is not Javascript's
fault that applying it on web pages is not as easy as writing Ruby
scripts in vim and running them.
Now I still would use Ruby instead of Javascript (e.g. with Rhino) to
implement a console application of course ;)

Javascript does not have the sexy syntax and block semantics that Ruby
has but its object model is great (maybe better in some ways as
Mixins, almost as Traits but there is of course no conflict handling
when extending an objects prototype)  and blocks can be simulated with
anonymous functions, I believe that I am not the first to say this on
this list:
Javascript is unduly underrated as a language because of the niche it
is used in.

Somehow it even feels wrong to take this niche away from it.

Cheers
Robert


-- 
http://ruby-smalltalk.blogspot.com/

---
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.
Ludwig Wittgenstein