Sean,
        Phillip is right.  Use IE to browse to
http://localhost:whateverportitchose.  You should be able to browse it
from there, and knowing that you can write your scripts.

I don't remember if Cassini always uses the same port, or if it
randomly chooses an unused one, so you may want to look at how to port
scan from ruby.

I'm thinking something ugly like, get an array of open ports when the
app isn't running, use ruby to launch the app you're working on, get
an array of ports now, and blindly assume that the new port is the one
cassini is using...  Not pretty but definitely better than manually
finding the port each time (if it changes that is).

--Kyle

On Tue, Apr 8, 2008 at 8:01 PM, Phillip Gawlowski
<cmdjackryan / googlemail.com> wrote:
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>
>  Sean Nakasone wrote:
>  |
>  |
>  | Yes, you are correct, the vendor said they are using Microsoft Cassini
>  | to create their exe.  Knowing this is already a huge help--thankyou.
>  | Using your advice I successfully used netstat -an to see which local
>  | port is being used.  But with a known port, how do I use watir to
>  | connect?  How do I use IE to browse from here?
>  |
>  |
>  If the application listens on the port (like a webserver),
>  localhost:port could work.
>
>  NB: I never used Cassini, nor watir, nor do I play a user of those on TV.
>
>  - --
>  Phillip Gawlowski
>  Twitter: twitter.com/cynicalryan
>
>  Let your compiler do the simple optimisations.
>  Don't strain to re-use code; reorganise instead.
>  ~            - The Elements of Programming Style (Kernighan & Plaugher)
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