----- Original Message ----- 
From: Yukihiro Matsumoto <matz / ruby-lang.org>
To: ruby-talk ML <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Friday, December 28, 2001 11:30 AM
Subject: [ruby-talk:29553] Re: New Rubygarden poll


> Hi,
> 
> In message "[ruby-talk:29541] New Rubygarden poll"
>     on 01/12/29, Dave Thomas <Dave / PragmaticProgrammer.com> writes:
> 
> |Last week's poll:
> |
> |     The [ruby-talk:12345] in mailing list subject lines should:
> |
> |     stay where it is                 26.28 % (41)
> |     move to the end of the Subject:  14.74 % (23)
> |     move to an X-ruby: header        40.38 % (63)
> |     disappear totally                 7.69 % (12)
> |     I use Gnus, so I don't care :)   10.90 % (17)
> |
> |     Total votes: 156 
> |
> |So, a majority would like it removed (but not a big majority). Will
> |the powers that control the list listen? Will there be major changes
> |coming. Will our list be forever different? Stay tuned... :)
> 
> I will remove [ruby-talk:12345] tag from the subject, somewhere in
> January.  I have to take time to hack my list server,written in Perl :-<

This is, of course, just my opinion.

The development of Ruby is not guided by a democracy, but
by a historically better method, the benevolent dictatorship.
Democracy is popular only because the "benevolent" part
is so hard to come by.   :)

I think that this certainly extends to the mailing list.

I, for one, would not be disturbed if Matz simply said, "This is
how it will be. I will ignore the vote."

If it were a language feature, I might be a tiny bit disturbed --
but that is even more clearly his domain.

At any rate, I would like to see the message number remain
easily accessible. If it has to be moved, I would favor the 
end of the subject line or the first line of the body.

As for a header: Well, you may flame me, hate me, or denigrate
me, but my most commonly used email client is Outlook Express.
To view a header here is not completely trivial, and I don't know
of a way to make certain ones always visible. Retrieving the
message number would be inconvenient enough I probably
wouldn't ever bother.

I know I am not alone in this. We might all wish to be full-time
Linux hackers, but I have many apps that I use that are only
available on Microsoft, and I have many friends and colleagues
with whom I have to interoperate closely. I still spend most of my
time [at home] on Windows.


Just my $0.01,
Hal Fulton