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Here's my solution:

hello, world  ", 2645608968345021733469237830984
(hello << (world % 256); world / 56) until world 0
puts hello

Have a good one,

Justin


On Fri, Feb 29, 2008 at 7:06 PM, Matthew D Moss <matthew.moss / gmail.com>
wrote:

> The three rules of Ruby Quiz 2:
> 1.  Please do not post any solutions or spoiler discussion for this
> quiz until 48 hours have passed from the time on this message.
>
> 2.  Support Ruby Quiz 2 by submitting ideas as often as you can! (A
> permanent, new website is in the works for Ruby Quiz 2. Until then,
> please visit the temporary website at
>
>     <http://matthew.moss.googlepages.com/home>.
>
> 3.  Enjoy!
>
> Suggestion:  A [QUIZ] in the subject of emails about the problem
> helps everyone on Ruby Talk follow the discussion.  Please reply to
> the original quiz message, if you can.
>
> ------------------
>
> Hello, world?
>
>
> The first program any new programmer typically sees is one that
> prints out "Hello, world!" to the console. This tends to be something
> experienced programmers also see when learning a new language. The
> first Hello World program was written in B [1] by Kernighan and
> looked like this:
>
>         main( ) {
>             extrn a, b, c;
>             putchar(a); putchar(b); putchar(c); putchar('!*n');
>         }
>
>         a 'hell';
>         b 'o, w';
>         c 'orld';
>
> Most programmers are probably more familiar with the typical C
> implementation:
>
>         main() {
>             printf("Hello, world!\n");
>         }
>
> Ruby can present the same output very simply:
>
>         puts "Hello, world!"
>
> But that's too simple... I mean, really... *anyone* can print a
> simple string to standard output. Can't we get more interesting?
> Hmmm, how about:
>
>         puts sprintf("%s, %s!", "Hello", "world")
>
> Eh, that looks too much like C. Maybe...
>
>         puts %w(Hello world).join(", ") + "!"
>
> Yeah, that's definitely looking Ruby-ish.
>
> Your task this week is to print "Hello, world!" to standard output
> using Ruby in atypical fashion. Some guildlines:
>
> - DO submit multiple variants in your submission, but we don't need
> 100 variants from everyone. Try to limit yourself to your best dozen.
> - DO keep things reasonably simple. I would expect many solutions to
> be one- or two-liners, some solutions to involve classes and
> functions, and a variety in-between. But we're looking for Ruby-isms,
> not volume of code, so don't write pages upon pages of code just to
> print "Hello, world!"
> - DON'T obfuscate unnecessarily. We're looking for interesting Ruby
> tricks, not utter confusion. A little obfuscation is okay, but a lot
> is to be avoided.
> - DON'T send me my own examples from above. I already did them. Do
> other stuff. It *is* okay if your solution is similar to mine,
> provided you make some interesting modifications.
>
>
> [1] http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/who/dmr/btut.html
>
>
>

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