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If challenge is what you REALLY want, look no further than the ultimate
authority in computer algorithms:
(The Art of Computer Programming
Series)<http://www.amazon.com/Art-Computer-Programming-Volumes-Boxed/dp/0201485419/ref
_bbs_sr_1?ieF8&sks&qid02740125&sr>By:
Donald E. Knuth.

Victor

On Feb 10, 2008 6:54 PM, Joe <qbproger / gmail.com> wrote:

> If you're looking for some interesting problems, and ways to solve
> them this book is pretty good (it's similar to Ruby Quiz style
> problems):
>
> http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Challenges-Steven-S-Skiena/dp/0387001638/ref_1_1?ieF8&sks&qid02686974&sr1
>
> This is a website that lets you submit source code, and it will be
> tested for you.
> http://acm.uva.es/problemset/
>
> Joe
>
> On Feb 6, 2008 12:24 AM,  <markonlinux / gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi Clifford,
> >
> > On Feb 6, 3:27 pm, Clifford Heath <n... / spam.please.net> wrote:
> >
> > > markonli... / gmail.com wrote:
> > > > "This problem actually turns out to be famous in computer science.
> > > > It's called the Knapsack Problem.
> > > > My questions are:
> > > > 1. Is there a definitive book/web site/resource on this and other
> > > > computer science 'problems'? (Whether Ruby, C, C++, Java, Perl
> based).
> > > > 2. Do people have favorite 'Data Structure and Algorithm' books?
> > > > 3. Other Computer Science book recommendations?
> > > > I'd love to get to a point where I could look at the quiz
> description
> > > > and say "oh.. that looks like the XXX problem" like some of you are
> > > > able to do.
> > >
> > > Lots of good suggestions for algorithms books to answer your 2 & 3,
> but
> > > note that I think I'm the only one who's attempted to answer your
> first
> > > question, and to point you to a list of the "known hard problems",
> which
> > > was also the subject of your last paragraph.
> > >
> > > Does anyone else have better answers to question 1, which seems to be
> > > Mark's main question?
> >
> > 1. was my main focus, but I am really appreciating answers to 2. and
> > 3. as well. So keep them coming ;-)
> >
> > Thanks for the wikipedia link. It's definitely a keeper. The book
> > James 'has on his shelf' lead me to this:
> >
> >      The Stony Brook Algorithm Repository
> >      (http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith/<http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/%7Ealgorith/>
> )
> >
> > which is also bookmarked!
> >
> > I reckon I may buy the 'Algorithm design manual' based on James'
> > description of the second half (even though the best i can find is
> > $140 here in Oz!!). Am also looking into Sedgewicks set (or the Corman
> > book).
> >
> >
> > This (http://www.bioalgorithms.info/book/excerpt-ch6.pdf) was also a
> > VERY good find! Seems like a very 'easy read' algorithm book.
> > I'll have to apply "The Change Problem Revisited" to Making Change
> > (#154) (if I can!) ;-)
> >
> > Keep suggestions coming everyone ;-)
> >
> >
> > cheers,
> >
> >
> > --
> > Mark
> >
> >
>
>

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