On Sun, Feb 03, 2008 at 10:42:08PM +0900, Marc Heiler wrote:
> Perl is a horrible language as far as aesthetics are concerned.
> 
> The expressions you want to do are riddled with snoopy swearing 
> characters.
> I would never recommend it as a learning language.

Paul Graham: "Real ugliness is not harsh-looking syntax, but having to
build programs out of the wrong concepts."

I think the attitude you've shown is indicative of a very superficial
view of programming language design -- not of problems with a programming
language.

Much as I loathe Python, personally, I still might recommend it as a
learning language.  That's because I realize that my personal preferences
do not, in and of themselves, amount to a definitive judgment of the
worth of the language for teaching programming.  Perhaps you could learn
something from that example.


> 
> Ruby is a lot better, however ruby in TOTAL is actually rather complex.
> 
> If you like CSS, html etc... you can start learning PHP, because despite 
> being a horrible language as far as design is concerned, PHP itself is 
> rather easy.

Holy cow.  PHP is the new BASIC -- a great way to inflict permanent brain
damage on yourself by learning it first.  It's a rare programmer who
starts out with PHP and fully recovers from the experience.  Usually, the
path to full recovery involves lengthy therapy with Perl, in fact -- the
language most familiar to PHP users without its inherently brain damaging
characteristics.


> 
> I dont think C, Java etc... fall into this language anyway because they 
> dont really have the ease of dynamic programming at all.

Actually, C could be very useful as a first-time learning language.  That
depends to a significant degree upon the student (and the teacher, even
if that teacher is a book), however.  Most students should start with a
higher-level language, probably dynamically typed, though OCaml is an
interesting exception to that general guideline about dynamic typing.  In
any case, C can be valuable for its relative semantic closeness to the
hardware.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
Larry Wall: "A script is what you give the actors.  A program is what you
give the audience."