On Wed, 2 Jan 2008 01:38:47 -0500, James Britt wrote:

> You may have a different recollection of ruby-talk of a few years ago 
> than I.

No, you're right; I was being flip, but I notice it when I look in the
archives.  OTOH, I also notice it now, at least compared to, er, some other
similar lists.

We're nice because Matz is nice.

Some of the frameworks built on Ruby have communities of young, VC-funded
brilliant hotshots.  Having been a young, VC-funded brilliant hotshot, I
can tell you that the impulse to act like a rock star - with the
mind-blowing concert, the hotel-room trashing, and the "don't you know who
I am" - is huge.  Especially when everyone calls you a rock star.

I'm dangling my legs in two pools at the moment; I try to keep up with
computing, and I also try to attend Berklee.  Which is, in fact, chock full
of next year's rock stars.  Only they're not rock stars yet.  There are no
cliques in that school; there are no rappers dissing other rappers, or rock
stars making bold philosophical statements (other than when they get high
after class).  Nobody spends any time criticizing someone else's fretboard
technique.  It's all about the music, and about learning from each other.

In five years, a bunch of them will be famous, and maybe one or two will
start acting like a big famous rock star.  People will pay attention, and
give them a platform, and they'll stop talking about what they learn, and
they'll start talking about what they KNOW.  Then they'll decide that they
know a lot about a lot more than music.  Eventually, you get Toby Keith
giving foreign policy lessons.  (Toby Keith did not go to Berklee.)

Programmers are worse, because on average, we have even fewer social skills
than musicials.  (Which is pretty impressive, if you've ever hung out with
a few thousand musicians.)  And we don't have to wait for the press to
build us a platform; we literally build our own.  So we can turn
*ourselves* into rock stars.

One thing that gets forgotten sometimes, when you become a rock star - and
I'm not talking about Zed, I'm talking about the rock-star-as-pundit
philosophy in general:

Tiger Woods takes golf lessons every week.

My voice teacher, who you have all heard on Domino's and Pillsbury
commercials, has a voice teacher.  His voice teacher has a voice teacher.
All the greats spend all their lives studying and jamming with the other
greats.  

I myself have a big ego from time to time.  (Usually from the time I wake
up to the time I go to bed.)  But I know enough to know that I can't start
teaching people what I *know*, because I don't *know* anything.  All I have
is a bunch of useful metaphors that I've learned.  I can tell people about
what I learned lately.  Maybe they'll find them useful too.

I think I've drifted off topic here, but in my defense, it's Wednesday.

-- 
Jay Levitt                |
Boston, MA                | My character doesn't like it when they
Faster: jay at jay dot fm | cry or shout or hit.
http://www.jay.fm         | - Kristoffer