On Sat, 15 Dec 2001, Massimiliano Mirra wrote:
> > An example of my current test project generates:
> > (sorry, it's in spanish)
> > http://www.digipromo.com/v_desk/test_desktop.php
>
> It sends me back to the www.digipromo.com main page when accessed with
> Opera, and shows something in Netscape, but icons do not respond to
> clicks (assuming that they are intended to).
>
> It was a nice surprise to see the Amiga logo pop up on the main page,
> though. :-)

sorry for that, it's a site of a friend of mine.

> Sorry, couldn't find any IE Debian package. <wink>

I know, I know...
I am doing most of the server stuff on Red Hat Linux, but
the final users are Internet Explorer 5.x users.
Besides... Opera SUCKS at supporting current W3C standards
(CSS1,CSS2,DOM,HTML 4.01) and Konqueror isn't yet up
to the challenge.
However IE does a very good job... technically speaking,
it is fast, and their current implementation is the closest
available to the current standards.
Mozilla renders it quite well, but it's painfully slow.
I am quite "pragmatic" in that issues, I try to use
the tool that works the best for the task, even if
it comes from Redmond.

well, we are way off-topic here, I'd better shut up :-)

>
> > just some ideas...
> > please keep me updated if you think of something else
> > regarding this issue.
>
> I gather the Mozilla interface is built with the XML-derived XUL,
> i.e. an interface description tat gets parsed and rendered.  I don't
> know more about it, but maybe it would be a practicable way?
>

theoretically it is, but it's one of the obscure areas in Mozilla,
poorly documented last time I had a look at it, and most of all...
not a W3C standard, anyway... it is out there to be grabbed
and used... so why not ?

The thing is, if you want your Ruby application to be run
by a well known, determined group of users, or you want to
reach a wider public, the answer is up to your needs.

Have you had a look at XForms, XHTML, and such ?

best regards,

vruz