Hello, 

The extension has to be precompiled of course. It is then
installed in a platform dependent folder (lookup in your
ruby/lib folder, for instance on windows native it's
lib\ruby\1.6\i586-mswin32). 

When you launch your interpreter, it "knows" about 
the architecture it was compiled with:

C:\> ruby -e "p RUBY_PLATFORM"
"i586-mswin32"

If you really want to distribute only the source code,
then on Windows you have to rely on some freely available
development environment, like cygwin or mingw.
On Linux and other Unices, gcc is the way.

... but for "real world applications" I think you should better
come with a graphical installer than with README and INSTALL
text files :)

Btw, is someone working on a generic purpose installer software
written in Ruby?

-- Christian

-----Original Message-----
From: Niko Schwarz [mailto:niko.schwarz / gmx.net]
Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2001 2:46 PM
To: ruby-talk ML; undisclosed-recipients: ;
Subject: [ruby-talk:28412] shipping real world apps


Hello out there,
I'd be honestly interested in how you ship your applications. Let's assume 
you require another class with 
require 'myweirdclass'
well, myweirdclass is half native, so it needs to be compiled when 
installing (normally), but: windows isnt shipped with any c-compiler!
so: what do we do to ship real world applications?

regards,

nick
-- 
Real Users know your home telephone number.