> As like java sun certification, (SCJP) is there any certifications exam
> in ruby thats accepted by companies globally.
>   
I guess that answer depends on how you define acceptance. Like all 
certifications, there are a lot of opinions of exactly how well having a 
certification actually relates to real world ability. Check out the 
bugtraq security list and you'll see lots of threads about how valuable 
a CISSP, MCSE, or any other of the dozen or so popular certifications 
are and people asking which one is the best or how valuable they really 
are. As Ruby gains popularity and more certifications are offered, I 
suspect we'll see a lot more of these questions on the latest Ruby 
certifications.

I should admit that I am biased because I am enrolled in the University 
of Washington Ruby Programming certificate extension program 
(http://www.extension.washington.edu/ext/certificates/rby/rby_gen.asp). 
When I was deciding whether to take it or not, I considered the 
following factors:

Cost: UW's program is 3 quarters (30 weeks) and costs about $1,900 
including fees. There are free online courses (see todays ANN email for 
http://www.rubylearning.org/class) and on this list about a month or two 
back, there was another program mentioned somewhere around Chicago that 
was about $2,000 for 8 or 10 weeks. No doubt a quick Google search would 
find many more.

Content: I think that to be truly proficient in Ruby, there is a lot to 
learn and for me, a lot to unlearn from years of programming in other 
languages. The 30 weeks at UW offers the time to go into a lot of 
subject material that cramming for a certification exam or a condensed 
program really can't do justice to. In addition, it takes time to be 
coding on a regular basis for these bits of Ruby wisdom to really sink 
it. You can learn the Ruby syntax from a book but only through hours of 
coding will you truly master what it has to offer.

Instruction: The UW instructors are top notch. Ryan Davis teaches the 
first quarter and he knows his stuff (note: I am in no danger of failing 
so I do not need to kiss his *ss hoping for some brownie points). I 
learn as much in the open question and answers time of each class as 
from structured lecture. To make sure the instructor is worthy to teach 
any certificate program or class, I would check to see how the 
instructor is connected to the Ruby community. Have they released gems? 
What is their work experience? Are they active on this or other lists? 
The quality of instruction is really a differentiating point between the 
various classes offered.

Commitment: For me, I like going to a classroom and committing that time 
each week for Ruby programming and then having homework to reinforce 
that. I have a bookcase full of books that I want to open up and learn 
more about but never really have due to work priorities, wife, kids, 
camping/ski trips, etc. If its optional, it usually gets squeezed out by 
something else. Taking the UW program is a good way for me to stay 
committed to learning Ruby over an 8 month period much more deeply than 
sitting on a couch and skimming a book for a night or two ever will.

Reputation: UW has an excellent computer science program and overall 
reputation which I think carries over to the extension programs it 
offers. As a result, I think having this experience on my resume is 
certainly a positive thing. I don't doubt that 'global acceptance' of a 
UW program is higher than that of many other offerings.

At the end of the day, I know that I will be a much better Ruby coder in 
June when the program is over than I am now which is a lot better than I 
was in September. Having a certificate in hand is nice, especially if it 
gets your foot in the door, but performance is really what matters. It 
doesn't take long for smart people (experienced coders) to weed out the 
good programmers from the bad programmers and that is something a 
certificate will never change. :-)

YMMV,
Jim