On Nov 27, 3:24 pm, Trollen Lord <trollenl... / gmail.com> wrote:
> Note:  parts of this message were removed by the gateway to make it a legal Usenet post.
>
> > But you are complaining about the general state of affairs; not
> > anything ruby specific. As my posts demonstrated (I think) the ruby
> > toolkit bindings are on par with the state of the art; whether that
>
> Yes, BINDINGS are on par. However...
>
> The state of the art? I'd say Shoes is that. It is dumb. Very dumb. But what
> being dumb means is that there is a promise of separating the "this is what
> I want" and "this is how I want to see it" from each other. It has been done
> in other technologies like the web (html vs css) ages ago already and it has
> major advantages. Shoes doesn't do it yet technically (nor ever will I
> think?) but take a look at how you define the GUIs. It wouldn't be hard
> removing the Cairo dependency and making it more dynamic. THAT is state of
> the art and would make defining most of the GUIs a wonderful and Rubyish
> process.

You might be interested in XULRunner [1] from the Mozilla foundation
(i.e., the dudes who make firefox). XUL is already a cross-breed
between markup and GUI, and works on the "big three" OS's as it comes.
It's actually very easy to use if you know HTML/XML. The main drawback
is that it requires JavaScript to drive it (inc. DCOM, XPCOM).
XULPlanet.com has in-depth documentation however. [2]. I have no
problem with JS, but some people hate it.

[1] http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/XULRunner
[2] http://xulplanet.com/

> They do in Vista32. Which I am using at this moment. I don't have very many
> things to complain about actually and have not bumped into even one single
> application myself yet that would not have worked. But I think that is
> irrelevant path to start discussing further. In any case, Vista seems to be
> closer to 10% adoption rate and somewhere perhaps near 20% (just a quick
> quess, although it is possible to estimate really accurately and reliably -
> there are methods for that if you have complete marketing data from longer
> period) there is the tipping point. After that it will be landslide. That
> 10% from roughly 1,3 billion computers is 130 millions already. We are not
> talking small "markets" here in any case.

I don't question the market share! And obviously, monkey-makers like
WoW are going to be updated to work *no matter what* ("OMG! LOL!!
LOLZ!! PWNED!"). But apps of lesser importance like FileZilla FTP
Server, aren;t guaranteed to work. My point was simply this; you can't
use a relatively new platform to hold against toolkits that took years
to integrate with the old platform. The standard is still the old
platform, the new, is, well...new!

Regards,
Jordan