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>
> Here are the four "big" toolkits and some infos:
>
> 2.) WxWidgets supports true native widgets. I know it supports native
>

Not on Vista anymore, where WPF is slowly beginning to be the standard.
WxWidgets is deterotiating at this moment pretty fast if compared to the
platform (which is developing).

Well, themeing is nice. It is not however the same as being genuinely
native. The looks is easy part but achieving the feel is extremely hard.
Some widgets simply always react slightly differently which bugs users even
though they don't always consciously notice it. That is why only native is
native.


> 4.) GTK+. Native installer (.msi/.exe), about 12 megs. Excellent ruby
> bindings and documentation. The default theme on win* using a .dll to
> render native widgets. Looks about 95% native and is comparably fast.
> Some screentshots of GTK+ running on win xp show how it looks. [3][4]


The 5% is still on missing on XP as you pointed out as well. Anyways, it is
the "legacy" look (even most of the applications that target XP use newer
"Office" style looks etc) and sometimes fails to render properly (some
corporate environments for instance have group policies for unifying the
look of desktops, breaking the service that the native widgets feature of
gtk+/wimp requires. It falls back to default gtk in that case..) I'd say the
part that it handles natively is great, but it fails way too often.

So there is no shortage of cross-platform, native-look and feel
> toolkits with ruby bindings. You just have to take the time and energy
> to learn them. :)


I have known all those for years. The shortcomings make them appalling. Why
I even bother talking about this is that it is quite possible to make a sort
of toolkit that is used for telling "I want this sort of interaction" and
the toolkit selects the proper real native way to accomplish it. That would
be like holy grail of GUIs for Ruby.

Btw, QT never has attempted to blend in. You can theme the looks somewhat
but it feels on all but KDE desktops pretty weird. On top of that some
things are really hard to get right and those are at least the menus. Popups
and the main menus are quite different and irritating on QT.

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