Speaking strictly as a new user to Ruby, first impressions are very
important especially  as a new user who are evaluating every aspect of the
language. If you ever get one part of it wrong, Ruby runs the risk of
becoming that other language, than a new and up-and-coming endeavor worth
putting time and money into. The more popular, the more likely all that love
Ruby will have something to love for a very long time.

This new logo doesn't look right for what I have seen in the last few weeks,
especially following this group. It would say it needs to be a bold,
brilliantly ruby-red icon, that's simple, but alluring. That is, if Ruby
needs a logo.

Same thing goes for that controversial certification thing. It's not that
you need it, but when you have it, people talk, and get interested just
because it does have it. For the average user, icons and certifications mean
nil, but for the future for all Rubyist, we need attention, and a growing
base of users who will continue to pour in investment (time, energy, ideas,
money, books, blogs, magazines, and bright red tee-shirts with ruby logos
all over them, with matching underwear for the holidays--Oh the power of
marketing)...

Quincy 

-----Original Message-----
From: James Britt [mailto:james.britt / gmail.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 11:55 AM
To: ruby-talk ML
Subject: Re: [ANN] the result of Ruby official logo contest

Peter Szinek wrote:

> http://www.rubyinside.com/so-heres-the-new-ruby-logo-639.html#comments
> 
> Does this mean that the Ruby world is clustered into (at least) 2 sets 
> of people: contributors to the Ruby mailing list and readers of the 
> rubyinside.com blog? Obviously not, but the contrast between the 
> quantity and content of the comments on the mailing list vs rubyinside 
> is pretty striking.

Well, I rarely comment on blogs, and prefer to hold discussions on lists
such as this one.

But I did add a comment on rubyinside.com; I do not care for the new logo,
finding it clumsy and complex, useless at small resolutions and monotone
renderings, and generally lacking in the qualities that make Ruby appealing.
It looks like something for QVC, not a 21st C. 
programming language.

Photorealism is the static typing of graphic design.

--
James Britt

"Judge a man by his questions, rather than his answers."
  - Voltaire