On Oct 26, 11:33 am, "Giles Bowkett" <gil... / gmail.com> wrote:
> the Ruby schedule is
> totally independent of the OS X schedule and co-ordinating the two in
> **any way at all** is illogical wasted effort.
<snip>
> we're going to have to manually update our Ruby installs just like we
> had to last time **anyway**, because Ruby will probably change again
> before OS X does. the "gem server" (not gem_server any more) example
> illustrates exactly that problem, because it's already happened - the
> new gems is in pre-release already

In terms of a ruby developer's workstation, I can agree with you. I've
been running the preview releases for a while now, and installing my
own build of Ruby in a different directory was one of the first things
I did.

However, there is a clear benefit to having some version of Ruby
installed by default as a system framework given that we can now
pretty easily use it to provide the guts of native Cocoa applications.
It's nice to be able to write such an app for general distribution
without having to worry about whether your end-user has Ruby installed
correctly (or at all) with the objective C bridge enabled.

--
Regards,

John Wilger