On Tue, Oct 23, 2007 at 01:29:16PM +0900, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
> 
> I'm not sure what "multi-paradigm" means, but Lisp 1.5, Common Lisp and 
> Scheme are at their core functional languages based on the lambda 
> calculus with "enough" imperative features, macros and side effects to 
> get work done. An awful lot of Lisp (and Scheme) code has been written 
> over the years, but it's still really Lisp 1.5 at heart.

I think, in this context, "multi-paradigm" is intended to mean
functional, object oriented, imperative/procedural, and maybe even a
little declarative, all at once.


> 
> You can almost get away with writing Lisp 1.5 in either Common Lisp or 
> Scheme. Where you'll get thrown off is
> 
> a. Lexical scoping. Both Common Lisp and Scheme are lexically scoped, 
> but Lisp 1.5 was dynamic.
> b. There ain't no "evalquote" any more -- it's "read - eval - print".
> c. Scheme treats "nil" as true.

Point C really throws me.  I guess my Ruby bias is showing.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
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