"Please, please, please do not do us the disservice of putting a
chapter(or more) on how to install Ruby/Rails."

I personally agree with that. Maybe the "installing something"
should instead be mentioned in a rather short Appendix
section at the end, if at all (i rarely have problems
installing something, and then usually only because the
author didnt provide install instructions, or the install
didnt work because its buggy ;> ).

It bores me to skip through 40 pages of that kind of stuff
when i open the book first :-)

I must say, Pickaxe2 was a very nice book in overall, the
other ruby books were not as good and thus I was a bit disappointed.

I think there would be only two cases where I would buy a new
ruby book:

~ something similar in spirit like Pickaxe2
- something that highlights in DETAIL the Ruby+C (K&R book is
sooooo boring ...) world. In fact, personally I would like
such a book that bridges the Ruby-C world :-)
(I am collecting all information locally too, and
expanding all the time, but I do lack a lot of C
specific knowledge still... so making bindings to simple
C code someone else wrote is still hard for me)


Ah... there may be one more example, which would be "advanced"
ruby that could include theoretical stuff as well. For example
sections about good solutions of something, even a little bit
math reasoning behind etc.. etc.. or efficient coding and
these kind of "hints" which are explained, and NON-TRIVIAL ;-)


PS: Thats just my 2 cc :-)
-- 
Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.