On Oct 7, 2007, at 11:10 PM, Jay Levitt wrote:

> On Sun, 07 Oct 2007 23:33:21 -0400, Eric H. wrote:
>
>> Sadly, I'd rather buy your book if I needed it than to pay for the  
>> info
>> to be included in the other books where I do not. ;)
>
> Sure.  The problem is the use case of someone who's been wanted to  
> play
> with Rails all week.  Finally has a long weekend, stops by Barnes &  
> Noble
> or CompUSA to find the appropriate books.  They have a few, some  
> are even
> the latest version.  He grabs them, takes them home, and starts  
> reading:
>
> "First, enter the console app, where you'll be able to execute ruby
> statements with real-time feedabck.  From console..."
>
> and the reader goes "What?  What conosle? What directory is it in?"
>
> Than then parses out to one of two problems:
>
> - OSX user with a built-in Ruby 1.8.2 install and library, and  
> potentially
> old versions of the gem updater that need manual intervention to start
> pulling down 0.i gem;
>
> - Ditto, but they've installed Locmotive at some point, which  
> stores Ruby
> and libs in yet another directory hierachy;
>
> - Windows user now, using the OCI, puts his lib under his C:RUBY  
> hierarchy
>
> - Another one tries to put it under My Documents
>
> - And the last one tries to get clever and start switching to  
> cygwin so
> they can use bash.
>
> Yeah, there's a book in there.
>
> Jay
>
> -- 
> Jay Levitt                |
> Boston, MA                | My character doesn't like it when they
> Faster: jay at jay dot fm | cry or shout or hit.
> http://www.jay.fm         | - Kristoffer
>
This is EXACTLY the scenario that supports boosting page counts with  
the continued detailed installation how-to's !
Why?
Though it means a few cents go to a few pages of stuff you may not  
think you need, it helps to ensure that we begin to develop some well  
documented and easy to access standard installations. That can  
definitely help reduce problems.
Besides, you may not think you need to install it again anytime soon,  
but what if your hard disk bites the big one? Hmmm?
Lightning storm, flood, you name it. No more installed Ruby. (unless  
you buy a new mac in a month)

Better scenario: imagine you are tasked with distribution/deployment  
of a Ruby app... support... it can be handier than you think...

but I digress, we have a wealth of rich stuff in Ruby that needs  
booking and Rubyists would definitely buy it.
Pdf is low cost. If a print publisher comes around and wants to make  
something more of it, then you're almost finished already!
So, rather than a Ruby codefest love in, lets get to writing about  
the libs you know best.
The language with the most docs&books wins! You aren't required to  
give it away. Many publishers are all about supporting ebook  
distribution on line, heck there's paypal and ruby for that, you can  
build it!