Chad Perrin wrote:

> Actually, as a first step in that direction a "common useful libraries"
> book -- perhaps called "prospecting for gems", or something cleverer --
> would be excellent.  I don't mean a listing: I mean an honest-to-goodness
> tutorial/primer on a bunch of great libraries/modules for common tasks.
> 

There exists a book that describes an assortment of gems.  It think the 
stated idea was that this was some sort of "must have" collection, but 
it comes off more as "these are the gems I just happened to learn about 
in my year and a half of using Ruby."

On the other hand, Hall Fulton's The Ruby Way has , I think, something 
of a "How to do assorted common or interesting tasks" theme, and does 
mention some of the less hyped, but no less useful, gems and libs.

Publishers seem deeply interested in following proven paths.  Most would 
rather publish the 100th dreary Rails book than the first Nitro or Iowa 
book.

It seems like an area ripe for self-publishing of brief, low-cost, 
PDF-only works.


-- 
James Britt

"Design depends largely on constraints."
  - Charles Eames