> Patterns are all about picking paths due to the problem and situation
> at hand, and for better or worse, the programming language is a big
> part of the situation at hand.  Most of the GOF book deals with the
> issues raised by statically typed oo languages, and aren't as portable
> as one might think.
+2

The language itself IS a pattern/structure that will determine and/or  
enable patterns and structures!
Frameworks/libraries will tend to enforce patterns and structures.

Ruby is pretty open and fully object-oriented by design, while  
enabling you to do procedural things to objects.

Rails is an example of a framework that really establishes and  
enforces particular patterns and structures.

Simply by using code by others and using the language, you'll find a  
lot of these things quickly in Ruby.
Some things are well established patterns in C / C++ books (searching  
& sorting algorithms) but they don't always make sense as Ruby since  
Ruby provides mechanisms that would be oh-so-much boiler plate code  
in lower-level languages.