On Thu, Sep 27, 2007 at 02:21:49PM +0900, julik wrote:
> I would love to join the recently started confession fest.
>
> I've got a similar problem as Jay, but in a totally different domain. 
> Having started as a script kiddo - what kind of book can introduce me in 
> the beautiful but-oh-so-scary world of things like bit shifts, number 
> representations, registers and that 0xF of them all, so that I can (not too 
> urgently) start in C with at least some level of self-confidence and 
> understanding?
>
> Is there some kind of book like "Everything you should know about the Von 
> Neumann machine to get by unscathed without brain damage" or so? Except 
> Donald Knuth because I also have a day job to fulfill :-)

There are two aspects to ASM. One is how to write efficient ASM code, which
is mainly covered by the code generation and optimization sections of good
compiler books (read the Dragon book). The other is just understanding the
low-level language of the processor, and for this I recommend finding a
copy of spim (MIPS simulator) and a quick reference guide to the
instructions (MIPS is very much a RISC chip, emphasis on Reduced, so there
is a very manageable set of instructions to remember).

If that's a bit too steep to climb on your own (I had it fed to me in
college, after all, so I wouldn't blame you), look for course web pages at
various respected universities that involve teaching MIPS assembly. They
should have some good guidance.

--Greg