> From: Rich Kilmer [mailto:rich / infoether.com]
>
> Use the linux distribution from http://www.handhelds.org
> There is already a ruby interpreter that comes with it.
>
> The key is writing the applications  ;-)

The key may be ease of installation and transparency for the average user.

If a PDA owner has to swap out the OS, and potentially lose the current application set, it becomes a hard sell to get general users
interested.

If someone told me they had a great app for my Palm, but said I had to lose all my other applications because they won't run
correctly on some new, required OS, I'd be less than thrilled.  (Just having to change OS's would be too annoying for me.)

Ideally, there would be some wrapper object that could be installed on an off-the-shelf PDA. It would provide a Ruby API for
existing applications.  Then, PDA manufacture might see that a Ruby scripting API makes it easier for developers to add value to the
product, so the API would become a native feature.  I believe this is why PDA manufactures included Java(tm) in the first place: if
they make it easy for geeks to write applications, then the PDA becomes more valuable in the eyes of potential (non-geek) customers.

If the currently hot PDA dev environment is Java(tm), perhaps a JRuby wrapper for some application could demonstrate the value of
Ruby.  You could feed Ruby scripts to the JRuby front end, and show that the typical Ruby script is smaller, cleaner, and easier to
write.

Then pester people at Sharp (among others) to just include a native Ruby interface in the first place.

Does anybody know what emulators are available for Java-"enabled" PDAs?


James