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On 9/21/07, John Joyce <dangerwillrobinsondanger / gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> On Sep 21, 2007, at 6:31 PM, Jason Roelofs wrote:
>
> > Gah, mistype, the install is:
> >
> > gem install ogre.rb
> >
> > Ogre really isn't that hard to get together, near everything you
> > need is
> > there at the site.
> >
> Well, everything for Ogre itself, but you do have to install a fair
> amount of stuff before installing Ogre from what I gathered...
>
>
> > As for rendering speed, most of the execution time sits in Ogre's C+
> > + code,
> > you don't lose much. There is a slight almost unnoticable jerk when
> > GC goes,
> > not sure what can be done with that. That said, I haven't built
> > anything
> > large with the wrapper yet, so I can't comment on how much you lose.
> > Hopefully Ruby 2.0 will be out soon(ish) so we can stop worring
> > about Ruby
> > execution speeds.
> >
> I wouldn't say that. Ruby speeds are expected to improve, but it will
> never be C or C++ speed.
> I do predict some game dev tool makers to officially begin
> implementing Ruby as a scripting language for their engines within a
> year or two!! (the sooner the better, imagine the expressiveness!)
>
>
I was talking more about people using Python, Lua, or Perl in the same place
as Ruby is here. "Scripting" languages will always be slower than native
code, that's expected, but once the speed gap between Python, Ruby, and Perl
is closed, then it's all about symantics, libraries, and just what you like
to use.

Also, as a plug, also check out Shattered Ruby, the game development
framework: http://trac.shatteredruby.com/ which uses Ogre through
Ogre.rbfor the rendering engine.

Jason

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