On Tue, Sep 11, 2007 at 06:30:06AM +0900, F. Senault wrote:
> 
> (Note that rubygem itself can be installed, and is somewhat integrated
> into the system too.)

That's what I've used.  I find it easier than to screw with creating my
own ports of gems.

> On the other hand, the FreeBSD ports system is not the universal
> panacea, in my experience.  I've had unstable systems and applications
> using it, requiring sometimes to launch a lengthy re-compilation of many
> ports, and the such.  But it's infrequent, and the base system is
> usually next to indestructible in a server configuration.  (I only have
> one FreeBSD system in a desktop config.)

How many desktop systems does one need, anyway?

I'll have two soon -- but one's my laptop, and the other will be my
recreated "game machine".  Both will be FreeBSD.  Otherwise, all I need
is servers.


> 
> No, no.  The _basics_ (which deamon to run at startup, and the
> parameters to launch them) are centrally managed, but each package still
> has its own configuration file, usually the sample file included with
> the software, patched to reflect the strict directory structure.

. . . but the sort of basic utilities that are in many cases viewed as
separate packages in most Linux distributions are maintained as part of
the extended OS by the OS development community itself in FreeBSD, which
means that there *are* a lot of tools for FreeBSD that share a more
consistent interface and set of capabilities than one might have come to
expect from working with Linux systems.  Such obviously doesn't extend as
far as software like Apache, but it makes the standard command line tools
we all know and love seem just a bit more lovable (and knowable, for that
matter).


> 
> This is the point I really, really like about FreeBSD.  Next to every
> system utility and library has a man page, and port maintainers are
> known to write or convert some for the packages that would lack those.
> Aside from that, the FreeBSD handbook is well written, and a good basis
> for many tasks.

s/many/most common/

The range of tasks covered by the FreeBSD Handbook boggles my mind, and
the clarity with which it does so is . . . well.  I'll stop babbling
about it now.  In short, it's great.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
Larry Wall: "A script is what you give the actors.  A program is what you
give the audience."