On Mon, Sep 10, 2007 at 02:05:59PM +0900, John Joyce wrote:
> 
> But while you're at it, if you're planning to do Rails, seriously  
> consider OS X as well, you can run Windows on the same machine these  
> days, so you have a one stop dev shop, and OS X is a BSD with a nice  
> Bash. It's pretty popular in the Rails community, and for good  
> reason. It's got a lot of good Rails development tools available, and  
> workflows well established.

MacOS X isn't precisely a BSD Unix.  It uses a Mach kernel (not a BSD
Unix kernel), and while it uses some basic BSD Unix environment stuff
(borrowed from FreeBSD) wrapped around that Mach kernel, the vast
majority of what you'll interact with is the proprietary stuff wrapped
around *that*.  The proprietary stuff, by the way, is basically just a
combination of things derived from classic MacOS and from NeXTSTEP (Steve
Jobs' non-Apple operating system from the early '90s).

MacOS X is really its own animal.  It is not classic MacOS, it is not a
BSD Unix, and it is not NeXTSTEP, even though it combines elements from
all three.  When developing GUI tools, it's easy to pretend sometimes
that it's NeXTSTEP; when sitting in front of it as an end-user, it's easy
to pretend sometimes that it's classic MacOS; when doing command-line
sysadmin stuff and anything that verges on server work, it's easy to
pretend sometimes that it's a BSD Unix.  In each case, though, all you'd
be doing is pretending.

It's better, I think, to simply realize it's not any of those other OSes,
and just think of it as MacOS X.

Your mileage may vary, I suppose.

-- 
CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);