I just switched from textmate to ruby-netbeans.
Being an ide it can do semantic-level things an editor can't do
because it's aware of the code structure.
Among other things, it points out variables in the code that aren't
used (usually left over from some change). That's great. I also like
the 'find occurrences'.
It's also quite a good ruby editor. The ruby syntax coloring and
source formatting are as good as textmate. Many editors don't do that
well.
I've also tried eclipse-ruby, jedit, and probably every mac editor
there is.  Right now I think netbeans is the best ruby editor around
and it's growing fast.
--Dave

On Aug 15, 10:56 am, Xavier Noria <f... / hashref.com> wrote:
> On Aug 15, 2007, at 7:20 PM, Wayne E. Seguin wrote:
>
> > On Aug 15, 2007, at 12:58 , Tim Bray wrote:
> >> On Aug 10, 2007, at 9:52 AM, harry pillei wrote:
>
> >>> I am looking into investing in an editor for working with ruby
> >>> (including
> >>> rails), any recommendations?.
> >>> Experience and feedback appreciated.
>
> >> On the Mac, NetBeans is wicked fast.  And, as of a couple of  
> >> builds ago, it has an actual useful Find Usages.  Find  
> >> Usages!!!!!  That's the single most important thing an IDE can do  
> >> for you after the basic syntax help.  Any other Ruby IDEs have that?
>
> > TextMate has a find in project which works similarly.
>
> Well, that one is a project-wide grep, so to speak. I'd expect from  
> Find Usages to understand the language, for instance, I select a  
> method on some class definition and it finds those matches. Same for  
> variables in a certain scope, etc.
>
> In practice Find/Replace in Project with the ability of selecting  
> which occurrences to act upon is good enough in my refactorings (as  
> provided by TM). Of course the more intelligent the assistance the  
> better, so that Find Usage, if it was as accurate as in a statically  
> typed language it would be great.
>
> -- fxn