On Aug 13, 6:07 pm, "Morten Brodersen" <m... / thirdwavegames.com>
wrote:
> I am using Ruby 1.8.4 on both Windows XP and Debian and both works fine.
>
> Morten
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: dima [mailto:dejan.di... / gmail.com]
> Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 5:00 AM
> To: ruby-talk ML
> Subject: Re: Ubuntu as a Ruby dev environment?
>
> On Aug 12, 7:43 pm, "M. Edward (Ed) Borasky" <zn... / cesmail.net>
> wrote:
> > joviyach wrote:
> > > Developing using things like MySQL, PHP, and Ruby has been an absolute
> > > nightmare on my Windows XP environment. I was wondering if Ubuntu, or
> > > some other flavour of Linux would be much better? I like what I have
> > > seen from Ubuntu, so far, but wonder how "RoR friendly" it is?
>
> > > <RANT>With Windows, I seem to spend more time trying to make the
> > > development environment actually work, than doing any development.
> > > It's really quite aggravating.</RANT>
>
> > > Any advice appreciated.
>
> > > Thanks,
>
> > > Jim
>
> > Some *general* advice:
>
> > 1. Develop with portability in mind. That is, if you are building
> > something that must be cross-platform, make sure your actually *have*
> > the platforms and you test religiously on them.
>
> > 2. Conversely, if you are *never* going to go to another platform, make
> > sure your marketing folks understand that. Yes, even open-source
> > projects have marketing folks. :)
>
> > Now a couple of specifics:
>
> > 1. It isn't clear at all what your user base is from what you've said.
> > If your user base is Windows users (or even potentially includes them)
> > then you must not only be comfortable developing and testing on a
> > Windows platform, but *fluent* in it. In short, get over it -- learn how
> > to do it and quit bitching about what a pain in the ass it is!
>
> > 2. Linux users tend to have their favorite distros and think nearly all
> > others (and Windows) are demon spawn. Linux *customers*, on the other
> > hand, tend to prefer stability, security and ease of use, and thus
> > gravitate to Red Hat and the commercially-supported version of SuSE from
> > Novell. Ubuntu is clearly making inroads into this market, as evidenced
> > by the deal with Dell. Money talks, you know. :)
>
> > My own *personal* preference in distros for working with Ruby in
> > general, as it is for other open source applications, is Gentoo. Because
> > it's compiled from source, you get more recent versions of the major
> > packages in the *stable* distribution than you would in most other
> > stable distributions, and you get the most recent versions for testing
> > within a few days of their release for the small popular ones, and as
> > soon as the more adventurous are willing to test them for the large
> > popular ones.
>
> > In addition, they have nearly all the major Ruby packages and gems in
> > the Portage repository already, including, of course, Rails, rake, and
> > rubygems itself, but *also* including RSpec, ZenTest and all of the
> > other goodies out of the Seattle genius pool, Nitro, Camping, etc.
> > (Which reminds me -- I need to file a bug to get them to package Ruport.)
>
> > But if your target user base is running Red Hat or Ubuntu or Etch RoR
> > servers, *that's* what you need to be developing on, not Gentoo. Sorry
> > about that. :)
>
> Nowadays it is merely the same on witch OS you develop Ruby or Rails
> projects.
> Most of the parts you will use are OS independent or present in all of
> them with minor differences.
>
> Linux is perhaps natural environment for Ruby and Rails development
> but you should always be open-minded.
> You never know on which platform your next customer is on.
>
> Personally I am on XP and Ubuntu with Eclipse and Aptana it makes no
> huge difference.
> Every platform has some unique things to spice our developer's life.
>
> Use all of them if you have means.

So much fuss about witch editor is ... whatever.
Pick up one you know the best and just start enjoying in making a web
universe a better place.
Do not waste time about A vs. B.
Go out there and make the difference.