I am using Ruby 1.8.4 on both Windows XP and Debian and both works fine.

Morten
-----Original Message-----
From: dima [mailto:dejan.dimic / gmail.com] 
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2007 5:00 AM
To: ruby-talk ML
Subject: Re: Ubuntu as a Ruby dev environment?

On Aug 12, 7:43 pm, "M. Edward (Ed) Borasky" <zn... / cesmail.net>
wrote:
> joviyach wrote:
> > Developing using things like MySQL, PHP, and Ruby has been an absolute
> > nightmare on my Windows XP environment. I was wondering if Ubuntu, or
> > some other flavour of Linux would be much better? I like what I have
> > seen from Ubuntu, so far, but wonder how "RoR friendly" it is?
>
> > <RANT>With Windows, I seem to spend more time trying to make the
> > development environment actually work, than doing any development.
> > It's really quite aggravating.</RANT>
>
> > Any advice appreciated.
>
> > Thanks,
>
> > Jim
>
> Some *general* advice:
>
> 1. Develop with portability in mind. That is, if you are building
> something that must be cross-platform, make sure your actually *have*
> the platforms and you test religiously on them.
>
> 2. Conversely, if you are *never* going to go to another platform, make
> sure your marketing folks understand that. Yes, even open-source
> projects have marketing folks. :)
>
> Now a couple of specifics:
>
> 1. It isn't clear at all what your user base is from what you've said.
> If your user base is Windows users (or even potentially includes them)
> then you must not only be comfortable developing and testing on a
> Windows platform, but *fluent* in it. In short, get over it -- learn how
> to do it and quit bitching about what a pain in the ass it is!
>
> 2. Linux users tend to have their favorite distros and think nearly all
> others (and Windows) are demon spawn. Linux *customers*, on the other
> hand, tend to prefer stability, security and ease of use, and thus
> gravitate to Red Hat and the commercially-supported version of SuSE from
> Novell. Ubuntu is clearly making inroads into this market, as evidenced
> by the deal with Dell. Money talks, you know. :)
>
> My own *personal* preference in distros for working with Ruby in
> general, as it is for other open source applications, is Gentoo. Because
> it's compiled from source, you get more recent versions of the major
> packages in the *stable* distribution than you would in most other
> stable distributions, and you get the most recent versions for testing
> within a few days of their release for the small popular ones, and as
> soon as the more adventurous are willing to test them for the large
> popular ones.
>
> In addition, they have nearly all the major Ruby packages and gems in
> the Portage repository already, including, of course, Rails, rake, and
> rubygems itself, but *also* including RSpec, ZenTest and all of the
> other goodies out of the Seattle genius pool, Nitro, Camping, etc.
> (Which reminds me -- I need to file a bug to get them to package Ruport.)
>
> But if your target user base is running Red Hat or Ubuntu or Etch RoR
> servers, *that's* what you need to be developing on, not Gentoo. Sorry
> about that. :)

Nowadays it is merely the same on witch OS you develop Ruby or Rails
projects.
Most of the parts you will use are OS independent or present in all of
them with minor differences.

Linux is perhaps natural environment for Ruby and Rails development
but you should always be open-minded.
You never know on which platform your next customer is on.

Personally I am on XP and Ubuntu with Eclipse and Aptana it makes no
huge difference.
Every platform has some unique things to spice our developer's life.

Use all of them if you have means.