Actually, depending on what text editor you are using, on Mac OS X,
ASCII(13) may still be used.

-- 
dda

On 8/13/07, Phrogz <phrogz / mac.com> wrote:
> On Aug 13, 3:03 am, greg <greg.johnse... / gmail.com> wrote:
> > How can you encode a ENTER? In case of space: \s, what about ENTER?
>
> On MacOS (before version X), pressing the 'return' key inserted a
> carriage return (CR) character, ASCII value 13, represented in a Ruby
> string by "\r".
>
> On *nix-variants (including Mac OS X), pressing the (enter/return) key
> inserts a line feed (LF) character, ASCII value 10, represented in a
> Ruby string by "\n".
>
> On Windows, pressing the 'enter' key key inserts a CR/LF pair,
> representable in a Ruby string as "\r\n".
>
> Thankfully, MacOS is no more, and now there are only two flavors to
> work with. Unfortunately, more disparities abound than just text
> files.
>
> In Firefox (and Safari) on Windows, the line endings for <textarea>
> elements in web pages are exposed to JS as LF characters. In IE on
> Windows, the line endings are CR/LF pairs. (I don't have any other
> browsers/OS readily available to test right now.)
>
> Does that help?
>
>
>