EVman wrote:
> This is probably a known issue by regulars, but I will post it for Ruby
> newbies using Debian.  I have tested the following several times on a
> fresh new install of Debian Etch just to make sure that the problem wasn't
> particular to my two year old Sarge.  
> 
> The apt install process is really hoked up with the Ruby stuff.  Ruby and
> Gems installs ok but don't run immediately.  Ruby itself installs as
> ruby1.8 but the paths are set to call just ruby.  Either simlink to the
> proper name or change the name of the executable or shebang it.

This is so that you can run multiple versions. You need the ruby 
metapackage which sets up the symlink for you (and can be changed with 
the debian alternatives system).

$ dpkg -S `which ruby`
ruby: /usr/bin/ruby

> Also the executable is installed in /usr/bin but the paths are set to
> /usr/local/bin. Again you either have to move it or simlink it or add to
> the path.

I haven't run into this (I have /usr/local/bin in my path so I wouldn't 
notice), but if it's true it's certainly a bug in the package. If you 
haven't already done so please submit it via the debian bugtracking system.

> 
> Gems installs ok but gives an "in `require': no such file to load".  This
> is because the package maintainers forgot to include zlibc in the package.
> Strange because Debian packages seldom have this kind of error. Apt-get
> it and gems should start working.

Again, please submit to the debian package maintainers. But frankly, I 
find mixing gems and debs to be highly unwise at best. I recommend 
sticking with one or the other, and my own choice is to use gems and 
manual installs for ruby, as I do with other things where I live on the 
cutting edge. I install ruby from apt, but everything else I do "the 
ruby way".

> 
> For some reason, libtk-ruby may or may not be included by something that I
> haven't tracked down yet.  Sometimes it is already there even though I
> didn't install anything related to TK.  But if you want to run Ruby-TK,
> just manually apt-get it.

Here's a horror story - in the old days the entire ruby standard lib was 
split up into dozens of packages. Makes me shudder just remembering it.