On Jul 24, 2007, at 8:49 PM, Daniel N wrote:

> On 7/25/07, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <znmeb / cesmail.net> wrote:
>>
>> Ryan Davis wrote:
>> > There is a certificate course at the UW starting this fall. It is 3
>> > quarters long starting at rubynewb, then rails/web development,  
>> then
>> > rubyjedi. no, not the real titles. You are not required to take all
>> > three courses. do what feels right. To take just one:
>> >
>> >     http://www.extension.washington.edu/ext/certificates/rby/ 
>> rby_sce.asp
>> >
>> > There is space available. apparently, plenty of space... so take  
>> make
>> > this a success, if you are interested or suspect someone you  
>> know is
>> > interested, PLEASE, help make it happen.
>> >
>> > -----
>> >
>> > Course syllabus for fall quarter is below:
>> >
>> >      1. Basics
>> >
>> >      2. Language Summary
>> >          hello world
>> >          invoking methods (go see ri)
>> >          Basic datatypes: string, range, numbers, regexps, symbols
>> >          Control flow structures: if/unless/case/loop/while/until
>> >
>> >      3. Testing Concepts & Unit Testing
>> >
>> >            From here on out, the classes and homework will be
>> >            driven via tests:
>> >
>> >            All homework will have impl and tests where the student
>> >            needs to write tests for the impl and find any possible
>> >            bugs and write impl for the tests to make them pass. By
>> >            attacking on both sides, you'll get a better
>> >            appreciation for TDD and still have real world examples
>> >            of (buggy) code without tests.
>> >
>> >      4. Language in More Detail
>> >          Containers: Arrays, Hashes, Files... Enumerable
>> >          More control flow
>> >          Iterators & closures (incl syntax for x in y;
>> >            break/redo/next/retry)
>> >          Exception handling
>> >
>> >      5. Object-Oriented Programming Concepts
>> >          Classes
>> >                is-a vs. has-a, instances vs classes
>> >          Methods/messages
>> >          Modules
>> >                include/extend, when to use vs classes
>> >          Philosophical: do the simplest thing that could  
>> possibly work
>> >
>> >      6. Playing with Standard Libraries
>> >          Libraries (find, time, yaml, marshal)
>> >          RubyGems / RAA / rubyforge
>> >          tcp chat server
>> >
>> >      7. Projects Week 1: iTunes Data Mining, Inc.
>> >            or self-driven project you'd rather.
>> >
>> >      8. Projects Week 2: Student Driven
>> >          Regular Expressions, CSV, Data Mining
>> >
>> >      9. Projects Week 3: Extending by playing with Popular  
>> Libraries
>> >          Hpricot - html/xml parser
>> >          Mechanize - web scraper
>> >
>> >      10. Playing Well with Others
>> >          Working with & contributing to the open-source community
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> Sounds fantastic!! How is this to be delivered? Electronically? Or  
>> must
>> one drive up to Seattle from, say, Portland? ;)
>
>
> Indeed, is it available on the net? If it is is it available
> internationally?
Regardless, THIS along with the slew of Ruby (and Rails) books that  
are pouring out of publishers this year goes a long way towards  
pushing Ruby further into being taken seriously by more people.
Most excellent!
Syllabus looks good too!