bgulian / gmail.com wrote:
> On Jul 23, 4:22 am, Alex Young <a... / blackkettle.org> wrote:
>> bgul... / gmail.com wrote:
>>> On Jul 23, 12:20 am, Chad Perrin <per... / apotheon.com> wrote:
>>>> On Mon, Jul 23, 2007 at 11:05:09AM +0900, John Joyce wrote:
> 
> Thanks for the examples.  Could I ask some questions or comment about
> about each one?
> 
>> For example, free the software,
>> charge for service.  It seems to work for (at least) Red Hat and MySQL.
> 
> How long did it take these two companies to get off some sort of
> patronage and start making money?
http://www.red-hat.com/about/companyprofile/history/
No idea about MySQL at all.

> 
>> Then there are companies like Neuros
>> (http://www.neurosaudio.com/) who use open software to sell hardware.
> 
> Yes, this is a traditional model for hardware companies, even before
> the advent of OSS. It may make companies like Digidesign rethink their
> model.
> 
>>   Then you've got bigger companies (like IBM) who see the benefit of
>> expanding the market or promoting an open standard on top of which they
>> then sell a closed-source product.  
>> You could argue that Apple have partially done this with OS X and the
>> tools that are distributed with it, but that relationship is more
>> tenuous.  
> 
> You could even argue that Microsoft with it's open source Ajax
> Foundation Library is using this model.  I'd be hard pressed to call
> these three companies open source.
No, but they do follow business plans that heavily involve open source 
development.  At least, Apple and IBM do.  MS have a very long 
barge-pole for not touching the GPL with stored somewhere in Nevada.

> Still, let's say I've got this great little editor called TextBuddy I
> want to get off the ground.  How do any of these models, including the
> kickbacks from Google mentioned later in this thread apply to me?
Find a business type that will support it.  If your editor can support 
it, it may be worth various businesses' money to have custom file format 
readers built, for example.  Alternatively, find something that *you* 
can do better than anyone else because you've got your editor (and it's 
especially good at whatever specific thing you designed it for), set 
yourself up in the marketplace doing that, and *then* release it once 
you're secure, possibly keeping to yourself the little bit of extra code 
that makes what you're doing special.  Near as I can tell, that's 
exactly what 37signals did.

To bo honest, text editors are always going to be really hard, because 
the free incumbents are so damn good (and, let's not forget, 
well-entrenched).

-- 
Alex