>>>>> "M" == Mark Slagell <ms / iastate.edu> writes:

M> Dave, care to explain any of that?

 Here in more readable form

pigeon% cat b.rb
#!/usr/bin/ruby -riis
puts dump
$-I<<
%%
As everyone knows, it is conventional to
use a program that outputs the string
"Hello World" as the first example in a book
or tutorial on a new language. In fact, Dave
and Andy's tutorial spends an hour covering it.

Is this the best way to introduce a language? Not in my
opinion. First, "Hello World" programs are just
linear chunks of code: there are few opportunities
to show a language at its best. And when you
think about it, it's boring to read.
$
%%
($-_=$_)&&
$><<
$:\
   .
pop.gsub(/.*\n/){(($&=~$/) + ? ).chr}.split( %r
(?##[^\g]##)
).join << $-0
pigeon% 

pigeon% b.rb
puts(dump)
($-I << ("
As everyone knows, it is conventional to
use a program that outputs the string
\"Hello World\" as the first example in a book
or tutorial on a new language. In fact, Dave
and Andy's tutorial spends an hour covering it.

Is this the best way to introduce a language? Not in my
opinion. First, \"Hello World\" programs are just
linear chunks of code: there are few opportunities
to show a language at its best. And when you
think about it, it's boring to read.
$
" % ($-_ = $_))) && (($> << $:.pop.gsub(/.*\n/) do
                     (($& =~ $/) + 32).chr
                  end.split(/(?##[^\g]##)/).join) << $-0)
 HELLO WORLD!
pigeon% 

 You must now the aliases, for example $-I is an alias of $:

 hint : the number of characters in each line is important :-)


Guy Decoux