On Fri, Jul 13, 2007, Joe Wiltrout wrote:
> Skt wrote:
> > Its an example of how to code one, and whys guide is free, so two birds. 
> > Although i dont know if you'd want to just skip to it without reading 
> > the guide a bit first.
> 
> Ty. But why do you make a new topic for every post? If you can't find 
> the post button, just click post with quote, and delte the qoute.

That's actually an artifact of the forum software.  You're actually
using a web interface to a mailing list, here, and ruby-forum has some
bugs.  Skt appears to be posting via email.  It's all showing up as the
same thread for me, in my mail client.

I'd like to also take this opportunity to throw my two cents in the mix.
I agree completely with the folks who are telling you to slow down and
go one step at a time.

To go from effectively no experience to trying to do graphics
programming in a language without intermediate steps is, frankly,
madness.  You need to learn the fundamentals before you can hope to
build a stable graphical game, much less a performant one.

If you're serious about game programming in Ruby, I think you'll find a
number of other people who are interested as well.  But you need to do
your homework, as it were, before you dive right in.  I'd suggest
starting by converting your game's mechanic into something that can be
played in text format, and building that.

This will give you a great deal of insight into the highs and lows of
your concept, as well as give you a pretty damn good familiarity with
the kinds of low-level Ruby code you'll need to write when you do the
graphical version.

Once that's done and you're happy with it, go back to your original
design and add the graphics layer.

Before any of that, though, you need to learn Ruby.  Others have given
you a lot of really good suggestions. _why's guide, the Pine book,
etc.  And, like James Gray said elsewhere, you need to get over your
resistance to search engines.  Relying on any community to get answers
to questions that are easily findable on Google will result in the
community losing their interest in helping you.

Cheers,
Ben