On Wed, May 30, 2007, Hakusa / gmail.com wrote:
> Also, I'd like to mention that I'd rather people have jobs than have
> computers doing them efficiently. In the future, there will be very
> few jobs that need actual humans and no one will NEED jobs. But how
> will we get there? Will poverty take us over first?

From this, I infer that you're not a system administrator.  Note that
I'm not saying that's a bad thing, just an observation :)

I have been a sysadmin, and I will be again, and one thing I've learned
is this: if ever you perform a task more than twice, automate it.
You'll save yourself time in the future to deal with real problems.

I used to work in a Network Operations Center where we were primarily
doing reactive "maintenance".  When a system at a site needed to be
kicked, we could either log in and do the multi-step process by hand,
or run a script that automated the process, thus removing the error of
(say) restarting a service on the wrong machine.

I haven't read the book yet, but from the synopsis it seems that it's
really about how you can leverage Ruby to help you do your job more
effectively and efficiently, rather than replacing yourself (or others)
with code.  It's all about finding ways to make your life easier by
automating repetitive, error-prone manual tasks.

I suspect that the type of everyday scripting and automation suggested
by the book is the kind that must be driven by a person, not the kind
that replaces one.

Ben