Henrik Schmidt wrote:
> Hakusa / gmail.com wrote:
>> If a language stops you from doing something just because it's bad
>> practice, then the language is treating you like an idiot. 
> 
> Fine, so don't stop be. Warn me that I'm doing something which is 
> probably a programmer error 99% of the time. Ruby stops me from all 
> sorts of things I can do in Perl. I think that's a good thing, since I'm 
> a horrible Perl programmer :)
> 
>> What if I
>> wanted to override a function for a little while? I could assign it a
>> new value and use the same methods of a different class!
>>
> 
> Then you'll just override it. My question is, why would you want to 
> override a method with a variable? I have no problem with overloading a 
> method with another method, and neither should the interpreter.

In fact, now that I think about it, how would you override a method from 
one class with a variable in another class making use of this feature?

Last year I asked a question also pertaining to variable/method 
ambiguity. At the time I thought one solution might be to force 
parentheses on all methods. I got some very good answers why this was a 
bad idea. The best answer was, IMHO, that it would make the private and 
protected methods look strange and unintuitive. The implication of that 
was of course, that you could create methods like private and protected 
and have them behave as keywords or even overload these methods and have 
them behave differently. I wasn't aware of that of the time, and I think 
that's pretty cool.

Basically, I'm looking for the same thing here. What possible use can 
there be for this feature? I don't get it.